Marching Forward

Kia ora on Waitangi Day.

What a perfect day to thank you for being part of a global movement that celebrates diversity, freedom, social justice and civil rights. There is, obviously, still a lot of work to do both here and abroad. But we’d like to thank you for reading this, for marching on the 21st, for talking to us by Facebook, for sharing our tears and joys and for encouraging us to keep the Women‘s March movement going.

We have a few things to share so please read on. Then join the Facebook Group, complete the survey and order a t-shirt.

If you’d like to contact us, the best ways are through Facebook or email womensmarchnz@gmail.com.

 

 

T-shirts! Hats! Beanies!

Souvenir t-shirts from the Women‘s March are available at the Women’s March Store, you can also buy hats and beanies.

Net proceeds benefit the Women‘s March Aotearoa New Zealand effort.

Please note: there is a shipping fee but we are told that is not per shirt. It will be more economical to order with your friends and submit a group order.

 

 

Join our Facebook group

We are blown away by the amount of feedback, messages and ideas you have sent us through the Facebook page. We’ve been doing our best to reply to them but we figured a better way would be to open the discussion.

Please join our Facebook group where we can all chat, make plans, discuss ideas and share our successes (and frustrations).

We have a handful of administrators who will review and accept members as quickly as possible (while doing their best to keep out the trolls).

 

 

What’s next?

We’ve received lots of messages asking ‘what’s next?’  That’s not an easy question to answer.  There is so much to do!

We’ll announce events and gatherings through this newsletter and Facebook.  This is a marathon, not a sprint.

Women‘s March Global is sharing 10 activities in 100 days. Let’s adjust them to work in New Zealand!  The first two are:

  1. Send a letter or email or make a phone call to your local MP about an issue you marched for. You might want to say something about the importance of pay equity, supporting scientists to research climate change or increasing our refugee quota. You can remind them (though they know this!) that an election is in seven months and you’ll be voting for the MP and party who best represent your concerns. For American citizens living in New Zealand, you can also call your Senators and Representatives (and your Governor) and make the same demands. There are phone numbers for various appointments. We’ll do our best to post them on our Facebook page.  For example last week we posted the phone number for the National Security Council (212-224-4751) that you can ring and state your concern that Steve Bannon should not be on the NSC and that there needs to be a Senate hearing. Just ring the number and leave a message.
  2. Hold a huddle. Women‘s March Global suggests that you get together a small group of friends, family, neighbors and fellow marchers, with this guide on the main Women‘s March website. Your role as a host is a critical part of how we keep the Women’s March spirit alive, build the movement beyond those who marched, and set a concrete plan of action. You can register on the main Women‘s March page but we also suggest you jump on our Facebook group to connect with Women‘s Marchers near you.

 

We want to hear from YOU!

Women‘s March Aotearoa/New Zealand started as a very (very!) small group of volunteers. Okay, there were two of us. You don’t get a much smaller group than that! But as the idea of the marches grew, we ended up with a few people in each of the major cities wanting to help. We’re here to stay – but we are still a very (very!) small group.

We need you. We know that in addition to being like-minded, you are also hugely talented. Many of you want to know how you can help. We love that. And we want to know how you want to use this platform and movement.

Please complete our survey and tell us what you think.  We’ll do our best to deliver and we will call on you for your talent and expertise.

 

He waka eke noa – we’re all in this together.